What Microsoft needs to do to keep its operating system relevant in years to come? - The Future of Windows

In 1985, almost all PCs sat on desktops, the Internet was a Defense Department research project, and the cell phone revolution had barely gotten underway. It was also the year that Microsoft launched a DOS front-end called Windows 1.0. Over the past quarter century, Windows has evolved many times, and it’ll change again in light […]

In 1985, almost all PCs sat on desktops, the Internet was a Defense Department research project, and the cell phone revolution had barely gotten underway. It was also the year that Microsoft launched a DOS front-end called Windows 1.0. Over the past quarter century, Windows has evolved many times, and it’ll change again in light of Microsoft’s investments in cloud services, mobile platforms, and other new technologies. To mark the 25th anniversary of Windows 1.0 release, Technologizer asked more than two dozen journalists, analysts, former Microsoft employees and others what the company should do to keep Windows relevant. Rob Helm of Directions on Microsoft offered this take: “For Windows to remain important, it will have to win and hold the world of low-end Web terminals--smartphones, Netbooks, and notepads--just as it won and held the PC. That means offering a small footprint, strong power management, and well-designed packages of software and hardware that are less open and more secure than a typical PC. For Microsoft, that's a technical challenge, but even more a business one, because it will have to work more closely with hardware and software developers than it ever has before.”

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