Microsoft changes 'random icon order algorithm in browser choice screen'

Microsoft spokesman Kevin Kutz, responded to last week’s reports that its European ballot screen was not truly randomizing the positions of the top five browsers, Microsoft said it has changed the algorithm that shuffles the spots. "We can confirm that we made a change to the random icon order algorithm in the browser choice screen […]

Microsoft spokesman Kevin Kutz, responded to last week’s reports that its European ballot screen was not truly randomizing the positions of the top five browsers, Microsoft said it has changed the algorithm that shuffles the spots. "We can confirm that we made a change to the random icon order algorithm in the browser choice screen for Europe," said Kutz. "We are confident the algorithm change will be an improvement." Last week, Rob Weir, an IBM software architect who had tested the ballot screen's randomization, accused Microsoft of sloppy programming that skewed the results toward Google's Chrome, most often put IE in the fifth spot at the far right, and gave Opera an edge over Firefox for the first position. His tests of the new algorithm showed that the chances of a browser ending up in each of the five top spots on the ballot are essentially equal. "This looks fine to me," Weir concluded.

[Source]