YouTube: 'Auto-captions to all users', Default size for embedded videos

Google is rolling out ‘auto-captions’ to all YouTube users, alongwith a "request processing" button for un-captioned videos that any video owner can click on if they want to speed up availability of auto-captions. For content owners, power of auto-captioning is significant. With just few quick clicks your videos can be accessed by a whole new […]

Google is rolling out ‘auto-captions’ to all YouTube users, alongwith a "request processing" button for un-captioned videos that any video owner can click on if they want to speed up availability of auto-captions. For content owners, power of auto-captioning is significant. With just few quick clicks your videos can be accessed by a whole new global audience. And captions can make easier for users to discover content on YouTube. As a disclaimer, Google noted “[...]Just like any speech recognition application, auto-captions require a clearly spoken audio track. Videos with background noise or a muffled voice can’t be auto-captioned. President Obama’s speech on the recent Chilean Earthquake is a good example of the kind of audio that works for auto-captions.”

Google defaulted to a “larger size,” for embedded code on YouTube.com (either 480x385 if 4:3 video, or 640x385 for 16:9 content) for best possible viewing experience. When using "Play in HD" option, it's best to embed the player at large size (at least 1280x745). If you play HD video in a small player, user's computer will have to scale down video to fit within the player, costing the user extra CPU cycles and bandwidth, which may result in choppy playback.

Google introduce four new films in the Screening Room, "Papiroflexia" (Spanish for "origami") is a animated tale of Fred, a chubby man with a passion for paper folding, who wants to change the world with his art. "Kung Fu Wang" explores the life of a martial arts master whose real contribution to society isn't what you think. In "Little Minx Exquisite Corpse: Cara," a less-than-glamorous actress in Los Angeles might not be exactly what producers are looking for, but why should something like that stand in the way? And in "Windowbreaker," a pair of young siblings build a home-alarm system to protect themselves against a group of neighborhood burglars.