Windows 7 'Confessions of a Pirate'

Ed Bott cites the Pete Townsend defense in this journalistic walk on the Dark Side of the Net “I've been digging into message boards and forums run by unabashed Windows enthusiasts who’re intent on breaking Microsoft’s activation technology, and actually try some of tools and utilities to see if I could become a pirate, too. […]

Ed Bott cites the Pete Townsend defense in this journalistic walk on the Dark Side of the Net “I've been digging into message boards and forums run by unabashed Windows enthusiasts who’re intent on breaking Microsoft’s activation technology, and actually try some of tools and utilities to see if I could become a pirate, too. Unfortunately, I succeeded. In this post, I’ll share my experiences, including close encounters with some very nasty malware and some analysis on how the latest showdown between Microsoft and the pirates is likely to play out.” “Unfortunately, the experiences I’ve written about here prove why that strategy doesn’t work. If you used a copy of RemoveWAT that was created in 2009, you were able to fool Microsoft validation servers with a 100% success rate. However, as the anguished cries of forum participants proved, the KB971033 update in February exposed all of those hacks, restoring the correct license files and causing the systems to (correctly) fail validation. As a result, the RemoveWAT developer modified his code and released a version last week that trumped the new update and once again allowed hacked machines to pass the activation test.”

More info: Confessions of a Windows 7 pirate