Adobe is working to block HTML5 specification

Dave McCallister, an Adobe Evangelist, said last year that, for Adobe, 'open' is all aspects of communications and technologies. Earlier this month, Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch said that “Adobe supports HTML and its evolution.” Despite all these supportive public comments however, Adobe is now working to block the HTML5 specification, particularly in the realm of […]

Dave McCallister, an Adobe Evangelist, said last year that, for Adobe, 'open' is all aspects of communications and technologies. Earlier this month, Adobe CTO Kevin Lynch said that “Adobe supports HTML and its evolution.” Despite all these supportive public comments however, Adobe is now working to block the HTML5 specification, particularly in the realm of the canvas element. While HTML5 is often contrasted with Flash as a means for supporting video playback, the new HTML5 canvas element presents a direct threat to Flash as a way to add animation or navigation elements to a webpage. The HTML5 canvas element also supports the creation of web games, advertisements, and other interactive content, a feature set that will make its adoption a direct threat to Adobe's Flash platform. Ian Hixie, a member of the HTML5 working group and an employee of Google, reported that "the latest publication of HTML5 is now blocked by Adobe, via an objection that has still not been made public (despite yesterday's promise to make it so)."

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