LCDs on eBook Readers don't affect eyes, Carl Taussig of HP

New York Times has an article “Do E-Readers Cause Eye Strain?” The answer is quite unexpected--put simply, no, they don’t--The new LCDs don’t affect your eyes,” Carl Taussig said. “Today’s screens update every eight milliseconds, whereas human eye is moving at a speed between 10 and 30 milliseconds. “The admonition offered by legions of mothers […]

New York Times has an article “Do E-Readers Cause Eye Strain?” The answer is quite unexpected--put simply, no, they don’t--The new LCDs don’t affect your eyes,” Carl Taussig said. “Today’s screens update every eight milliseconds, whereas human eye is moving at a speed between 10 and 30 milliseconds. “The admonition offered by legions of mothers — "Don't sit so close to TV" — isn't really an option when it comes to e-reading devices. You’ve to get close to screen to use it. As consumers decide whether to make this jump and which technology to use, one key question is how reading on a screen affects the eyes. First of all: doctors say that reading on a screen won't cause any harm. "Most of what our mothers told us about our eyes was wrong," said Dr. Travis Meredith, chair of ophthalmology department at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. "Sitting close to a television, or computer screen, isn't bad for our eyes. It’s a variety of other factors that can cause physical fatigue" .. the ergonomics of reading screens and lack of blinking when we stare at them play a big role in eye fatigue.” With e-readers, there’re currently numerous display technologies available, from black-and-white E Ink technology found in Amazon.com’s Kindle and Barnes & Noble Nook, to the coming full-color IPS LCD display that’ll come built into Apple’s iPad. And then there’s old-fashioned paper. Does one offer a better reading experience than the others?

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