Developing 'engergy-efficiency' features for Windows 7

Stephen Berard, recipient of Microsoft's quarterly Environmental Action Award for his work making the Windows 7 platform more energy efficient. With Windows 7, energy efficiency focus included computer servers. Servers consume a lot of energy, and the vast majority of energy is turned into heat, which then requires air conditioning to cool the machines and […]

Stephen Berard, recipient of Microsoft's quarterly Environmental Action Award for his work making the Windows 7 platform more energy efficient. With Windows 7, energy efficiency focus included computer servers. Servers consume a lot of energy, and the vast majority of energy is turned into heat, which then requires air conditioning to cool the machines and to keep them from overheating. This’s especially important in datacenters with large numbers of servers. Windows 7 makes servers more energy efficient than ever—and also more manageable. Administrators can monitor energy consumption and adjust power settings across their organization, reducing the amount of wasted energy. “My main focus for Windows 7 was related to server power management. Our goal was to improve overall power consumption of servers. We wanted to take technologies we use in mobile and laptop space and apply them to servers. As a result, we delivered a server operating system that’s more efficient and more manageable than any other version of Windows. Using Windows Server 2008 R2, administrators are able to monitor energy consumption just like any other performance metric in Windows. This enables them to adjust power settings to suit the needs of their business. Further, using tools like System Center Operations Manager, administrators can manage and monitor literally hundreds of Windows Server systems across their organization,” Berard said.