Windows PowerShell 2.0: What's new and getting started

This post looks at some of the new features in Windows PowerShell 2.0, included in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. PowerShell 2.0 is available for XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista-SP1, and Server 2008 RTM. PowerShell 2.0 includes several significant features that extend its use, improve its usability, and allow you to control and […]

This post looks at some of the new features in Windows PowerShell 2.0, included in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. PowerShell 2.0 is available for XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista-SP1, and Server 2008 RTM. PowerShell 2.0 includes several significant features that extend its use, improve its usability, and allow you to control and manage Windows-based environments more easily and comprehensively. PowerShell 2.0 is backward compatible: Cmdlets, providers, snap-ins, scripts, functions, and profiles that were designed for PowerShell 1.0 work in PowerShell 2.0 without changes. To install Windows Powershell on a Server Core installation of Windows Server 2008 R2, issue the following three commands:

dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:NetFx2-ServerCore
dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:MicrosoftWindowsPowerShell
dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:ServerManager-PSH-Cmdlets

If you also need 32bit support in Windows Powershell, also issue following two (again: case sensitive) commands:

dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:NetFx2-ServerCore-WOW64
dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:MicrosoftWindowsPowerShell-WOW64

To start using PowerShell you need to start it up. For some strange reason the path where PowerShell resides is not added to the %PATH% variable after installing, so you need to drill down to it, before you can start PowerShell. Use following commands:

cd C:\Windows\system32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0
powershell

Showing off PowerShell:

PS > enable-windowsfeature netFX2-ServerCore-WoW64
PS > import-module ServerManager
PS > get-windowsfeature

Full Article: What’s new in Windows PowerShell 2.0