'Chinese government administers internet according to law...' China responds

China responded to Google's announcement of the “end to censorship and a possible end to Google Search in China”. A Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu said: “The Chinese government administers the Internet according to law and we have explicit stipulations over what content can be spread on the Internet,” in Beijing. China maintains a strict […]

China responded to Google's announcement of the “end to censorship and a possible end to Google Search in China”. A Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu said: “The Chinese government administers the Internet according to law and we have explicit stipulations over what content can be spread on the Internet,” in Beijing. China maintains a strict Internet censorship program in accordance with its own laws. Often referred to as the “Great Firewall of China,” a Harvard study cites at least 18,000 websites that’re blocked from within mainland China. “We stand aligned that these kinds of attacks're deeply disturbing and strongly believe that violation of user privacy is something that we as Internet pioneers must all oppose,” said a Yahoo representative to WSJ. “VeriSign's iDefense security lab, says they tracked the source of servers used in the attack. ‘The source IPs and drop server of the attack correspond to a single foreign entity consolidating either of agents of the Chinese state or proxies thereof.’ Additionally, it was determined that ‘command and control’ servers were used to run the malware used in the attack.”