Google say goodbye to Gears, welcomes HTML5

Google Gears has been pushing web applications to use them local data and run offline. As Google prepares to release its first beta version of Chrome for the Mac (a developer preview has been available for months), Google is letting the sun set on its Gears project. "We are excited that much of the technology […]

Google Gears has been pushing web applications to use them local data and run offline. As Google prepares to release its first beta version of Chrome for the Mac (a developer preview has been available for months), Google is letting the sun set on its Gears project. "We are excited that much of the technology in Gears, including offline support and geolocation APIs, are being incorporated into the HTML5 spec as an open standard supported across browsers, and see that as the logical next step for developers looking to include these features in their websites". There’re still some issues, though, because HTML5 is still far from universally-adopted, and Google isn't supporting Gears for some browsers. Even Google's own Chrome doesn't work with Gears on a Mac. A Google spokesman announced "We're continuing to support Gears so that nothing breaks for sites that use it. But we expect developers to use HTML5 for these features moving forward as it's a standards-based approach that will be available across all browsers."