Redirecting 'nonexistent domains' DNS requests harm internet, says ICANN

ICANN condemned practice of redirecting Internet users to third-party web site when they misspell a web address and type a domain name that doesn’t exist. Rather than return an error message for DNS requests for "nonexistent domains," some DNS operators send back the IP address of another domain, a process known as NXDOMAIN substitution. Handling […]

ICANN condemned practice of redirecting Internet users to third-party web site when they misspell a web address and type a domain name that doesn’t exist. Rather than return an error message for DNS requests for "nonexistent domains," some DNS operators send back the IP address of another domain, a process known as NXDOMAIN substitution. Handling DNS requests this way has a number drawbacks that could lead to Internet not working properly, according to ICANN -- published its opinions and findings in a draft memo before the introduction of new gTLDs (generic top-level domains). And discourages practice of redirecting requests for nonexistent domains, and suggested banning it in a draft of agreement owners of new gTLDs would have to sign. ICANN wants domain owners wishing to redirect DNS requests to first explain why doing so won't cause any problems.