Windows 7 OEM System Builder licenses and Microsoft

Ed Bott does speak EULA language better; If Microsoft expects its customers to take license agreements seriously, it has a responsibility to communicate the terms of those agreements to its customers clearly and unambiguously.[…] I’m talking about OEM System Builder licenses for Windows desktop editions. […] According to Microsoft, [those who] bought that software and […]

Ed Bott does speak EULA language better;

If Microsoft expects its customers to take license agreements seriously, it has a responsibility to communicate the terms of those agreements to its customers clearly and unambiguously.[…] I’m talking about OEM System Builder licenses for Windows desktop editions. […] According to Microsoft, [those who] bought that software and installed it on their own new (or old) PC ... are violating the terms of OEM System Builder license agreement, which says, in convoluted language, that you must install software using OEM Preinstallation Kit and then resell PC to a third party. If you install that software on your own PC, you don’t have a “genuine” copy of Windows.

And here’s Q&A, asked and answered two days after Windows 7 was released last month:

Q: I build my own computers–mainly so I’ll know what’s in them and dont have to fool with the manufacturers’ alleged “tech support” while I’m in warranty. At some point in the future I’ll probably want to build one with Windows 7–when I do, do I qualify to use the “OEM System Builders” version or do I have to buy a retail copy?

A: Yes, you can buy the “OEM System Builders” version of Windows 7. Many online stores sell it.

Full Article: ZDNet