Windows XP 'anti-piracy tool' case proceeding toward a possible trial

Microsoft's lawyers’re still battling disgruntled PC users over the way company distributed anti-piracy tool for Windows XP nearly eight years ago. The dispute has been slowly proceeding toward a possible trial. The big question is whether it’ll be certified as a class action, potentially opening up the case to millions of additional PC users. Three weeks ago, on Sept. […]

Microsoft's lawyers’re still battling disgruntled PC users over the way company distributed anti-piracy tool for Windows XP nearly eight years ago. The dispute has been slowly proceeding toward a possible trial. The big question is whether it’ll be certified as a class action, potentially opening up the case to millions of additional PC users. Three weeks ago, on Sept. 22, Microsoft filed a formal opposition (PDF, 52 pages) to class certification bid saying the company acted properly in distributing WGA Validation, and proposed class members read information and gave their consent through many different affirmative acts before choosing to install WGA Validation, and describing the plaintiffs' claims as a "fictional thesis," company says in its response. Microsoft has made a series of changes in Windows Genuine Advantage in response to repeated criticism. For Windows 7, company has rebranded anti-piracy tools "Windows Activation Technologies."