"Microsoft's "ballot screen" will be entirely ineffective, ECIS

The European Committee for Interoperable Systems, a group group opposing Microsoft's software-bundling practices in Europe, said the proposed ballot screen puts too many hurdles in front of Windows users who might want to switch to a browser other than Internet Explorer. One ECIS member is Norway-based Opera, which makes a browser most popular in Europe. Selecting another browser […]

The European Committee for Interoperable Systems, a group group opposing Microsoft's software-bundling practices in Europe, said the proposed ballot screen puts too many hurdles in front of Windows users who might want to switch to a browser other than Internet Explorer. One ECIS member is Norway-based Opera, which makes a browser most popular in Europe. Selecting another browser requires "the user to confirm and answer threatening and confusing warnings and questions," the group's lawyer, Thomas Vinje of Clifford Chance LLP, told WSJ. "Microsoft has cunningly found a way to accept the commission's suggestion of a ballot screen, but to do so in a way that will be entirely ineffective."