'Bahama Botnet' Most advanced sources of click fraud

Click Forensics discovered an advanced sources of click fraud, named it the “Bahama botnet” because when discovered it was redirecting traffic through 200,000 parked domain sites located in Bahamas. Its reprogrammed to redirect through other intermediate sites hosted in Amsterdam, U.K., San Jose, and CA. Click Forensics has tracked instances where Bahama botnet has affected up to 30% of an advertiser's monthly search marketing […]

Click Forensics discovered an advanced sources of click fraud, named it the “Bahama botnet” because when discovered it was redirecting traffic through 200,000 parked domain sites located in Bahamas. Its reprogrammed to redirect through other intermediate sites hosted in Amsterdam, U.K., San Jose, and CA. Click Forensics has tracked instances where Bahama botnet has affected up to 30% of an advertiser's monthly search marketing budget. “Clicks on organic search results’re redirected through a series of parked domains across a number of top-tier ad providers (search engines and ad networks), eventually arriving at an advertiser unrelated to the original query. The user’s momentarily confused, but likely just performs the search again, this time with easy success. What makes the botnet so insidious is that it operates intermittently so that the user doesn’t really know that anything is wrong,” reports.

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