Windows 7 demonstrated major improvements in battery life

Microsoft Windows 7 operating system, together with and Intel's upcoming Westmere processors’ll result in significant increases in battery life. In a demonstration of two identically configured ThinkPads T400s, Intel and Microsoft claimed that a Windows XP SP2 machine consumed on average 20.2 watts, while the Windows 7 machine consumed 15.4 watts. That translated to about 1.4 hours […]

Microsoft Windows 7 operating system, together with and Intel's upcoming Westmere processors’ll result in significant increases in battery life. In a demonstration of two identically configured ThinkPads T400s, Intel and Microsoft claimed that a Windows XP SP2 machine consumed on average 20.2 watts, while the Windows 7 machine consumed 15.4 watts. That translated to about 1.4 hours of additional battery life, executives said. “The dramatic leap in battery life appears tied to a technology known as Windows 7 timer coalescing, a technical term for minimizing the time in which the processor enters a high-performance, full-power state. In the past, different applications’ve called for the processor's performance at varying times, requiring the CPU to ramp up performance and then down again, frequently. By synchronizing the timers, Intel managed to boost battery life tremendously. Intel said they also expect to take more advantage of this technology in future platforms.”