Windows Server 2008 R2: Introducing AD Recycle Bin

Starting in Windows Server 2008 R2, Active Directory now implements a true recycle bin. You’ll no longer need an authoritative restore to recover deleted users, groups, OU’s, or other objects. Instead, it’s now possible to use PowerShell commands to bring back objects with all their attributes, backlinks, group memberships, and metadata. AD Recycle Bin (ADRB) was a […]

Starting in Windows Server 2008 R2, Active Directory now implements a true recycle bin. You’ll no longer need an authoritative restore to recover deleted users, groups, OU’s, or other objects. Instead, it’s now possible to use PowerShell commands to bring back objects with all their attributes, backlinks, group memberships, and metadata. AD Recycle Bin (ADRB) was a long time coming and it definitely has its idiosyncrasies. This post talk about a few aspects of this new system: Understanding how ADRB works under the covers; What the requirements are and how to turn ADRB on; Using ADRB, along with some best practices; Troubleshooting common issues people run into with ADRB. Simply put, ADRB allows you to recover objects immediately, without the need to use your System State backups, latent sites, or 3rd party add-ons. It does this by implementing two new attributes, and using two existing attributes.

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