Standard, Enterprise and Datacenter editions of Windows Servers Domain Controllers

Choosing new Active Directory environment, eventually require choosing the Operating System for Active Directory Domain Controllers. The key question here’s whether the Enterprise and Datacenter Editions add any substantial functionality to the Standard Edition. Here’s the differences between the main Windows Server editions: One of the main differences between the Standard, Enterprise and Datacenter editions of Windows Servers is the amount […]

Choosing new Active Directory environment, eventually require choosing the Operating System for Active Directory Domain Controllers. The key question here’s whether the Enterprise and Datacenter Editions add any substantial functionality to the Standard Edition. Here’s the differences between the main Windows Server editions: One of the main differences between the Standard, Enterprise and Datacenter editions of Windows Servers is the amount of supported processor sockets. Now, Domain Controllers won’t burn a lot of processor cycles, except:

-when Active Directory infrastructure’s quite elaborate. In that case, scaling out Active Directory by implementing additional Domain Controllers’s the way to go.
-for Domain Controller, holding the PDC emulator Flexible Single Master Operations (FSMO) role, since all password and group policy changes replicate from this server. Implementing this server as a dedicated Domain Controller and splitting Windows, the system volume (SYSVOL), the Active Directory database and the Active Directory logs to different physical sets of spindles’ll get you pretty far with four logical processors.

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