Microsoft's new model for 'Oslo' modeling language

Douglas Purdy acknowledged all the confusion that had been generated over associating the modeling language with Dublin, arguably a very different technology for Windows Server, giving it the ability to deploy cloud services. The company now intends to treat these separate technologies as separate, and to stop extending the boundaries of Oslo into Ireland and Dublin into […]

Douglas Purdy acknowledged all the confusion that had been generated over associating the modeling language with Dublin, arguably a very different technology for Windows Server, giving it the ability to deploy cloud services. The company now intends to treat these separate technologies as separate, and to stop extending the boundaries of Oslo into Ireland and Dublin into Norway, explained Purdy. "We started using the term 'Oslo' for only the modeling platform pieces of the overall vision," Purdy wrote. "In addition, we would roll out a bunch of technologies in the .NET 4.0 wave. So when you hear about things like WF 4.0, WCF 4.0, 'Dublin,' MEF [Managed Extensibility Framework], the unified XAML stack -- all of those things were part of 'Oslo' at some stage."