Windows 7 Starter: Ballmer confirms restrictions for netbooks

Steve Ballmer got more specific in describing the limitations computer makers must abide by if they're to install Windows 7 Starter Edition on their machines. Starter is the least feature-rich edition of the operating system available worldwide, and’ll not be sold direct to consumers or businesses. It’ll be available only to OEMs, or "original equipment manufacturers," […]
Steve Ballmer got more specific in describing the limitations computer makers must abide by if they're to install Windows 7 Starter Edition on their machines. Starter is the least feature-rich edition of the operating system available worldwide, and’ll not be sold direct to consumers or businesses. It’ll be available only to OEMs, or "original equipment manufacturers," such as Acer, ASUS, Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Toshiba. "Our license says it's got to have a super-small screen, which means it probably has a super-small keyboard, and it has to have a certain processor and blah, blah, blah, blah, blah." According to TechARP, Microsoft will only sell Starter to OEMs for use on netbooks that have a 10.2-in. or smaller screen, no more than 1GB of memory, a hard disk drive of 250GB or less (or a solid-state drive no larger than 64GB) and a single-core processor no faster than 2GHz.