Microsoft's Stephen Elop talks about Office 2010, Google and more

Stephen Elop is convinced that even in a world of free, browser-based productivity software, consumers and businesses will continue to pay for Office, as there’s still plenty of life in the full version. Microsoft is adding browser-based versions of Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and OneNote with Office 2010. "At the highest level, what we're able to put forward to […]

Stephen Elop is convinced that even in a world of free, browser-based productivity software, consumers and businesses will continue to pay for Office, as there’s still plenty of life in the full version. Microsoft is adding browser-based versions of Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and OneNote with Office 2010. "At the highest level, what we're able to put forward to our customers is not just the best productivity experience, but one that spans the PC, the browser environment, the Web environment, services, and so forth, and the mobile device," Elop said. At WPC, Microsoft will give people a feel for how this works and is expected to start broader testing of the first piece--the desktop applications. As for Google, Elop said that most businesses still think of Google as a search company or are just kicking the tires on Google Docs.