THIS article will self-erase in 10 seconds!!

THIS article will self-erase in 10 seconds!!* A team at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, coated gold nanoparticles with a layer of hair-like molecules called 4-(11-mercaptoundecanoxy)azobenzene or MUA. When zapped with ultraviolet light, these filaments change their shape and charge distribution, causing the nanoparticles to congregate together and change colour (see diagram). "The colour of […]

THIS article will self-erase in 10 seconds!!* A team at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, coated gold nanoparticles with a layer of hair-like molecules called 4-(11-mercaptoundecanoxy)azobenzene or MUA. When zapped with ultraviolet light, these filaments change their shape and charge distribution, causing the nanoparticles to congregate together and change colour (see diagram). "The colour of the nanoparticles depends on how close they are to one another," says lead researcher Bartosz Grzybowski. In the absence of UV light, the MUA gradually reverts to its original shape, allowing the nanoparticles to disperse and the images to disappear. (*At least it would if it had been written on a film that exploits the colour-changing ability of nanoparticles.)

Source:→ New Scientist