Sun Cloud taking different track then Java

Sun Microystems, which announced Sun Cloud in March, is taking a different track than the Java clouds from Google, Aptana, and Stax because it wants to be more than just a Java provider. The new cloud will create new clusters of machines from any disk image, including some of the most popular versions of Linux […]

Sun Microystems, which announced Sun Cloud in March, is taking a different track than the Java clouds from Google, Aptana, and Stax because it wants to be more than just a Java provider. The new cloud will create new clusters of machines from any disk image, including some of the most popular versions of Linux and Solaris. Java, of course, will be found in most of these images, but you don't need to use it if you want to, say, run some emulated version of Cobol on a version of Puppy Linux. Unless Sun Cloud is interrupted by Oracle's acquisition, it should be available in a few months. "One of the things we've noticed is that people get concerned about getting locked in." "We also anticipate third parties will want to create images and make them available on the cloud as well," said Craig McClanahan.

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