Google transiting to IPv6

Google which handles gargantuan amounts of search engine traffic, has gradually been making more of its Web properties available over IPv6, starting with an IPv6 access to its search engine in March 2008. The range of other Google properties similarly available expanded to include Google Maps, said Lorenzo Colitti, a Google network engineer at an Internet Engineering Task […]

Google which handles gargantuan amounts of search engine traffic, has gradually been making more of its Web properties available over IPv6, starting with an IPv6 access to its search engine in March 2008. The range of other Google properties similarly available expanded to include Google Maps, said Lorenzo Colitti, a Google network engineer at an Internet Engineering Task Force meeting.

The big advantage IPv6 has over IPv4 is the number of unique addresses it can accommodate--4.3 billion for IPv4 compared to about 34,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 for IPv6. Although 4.3 billion may sound like a lot, addresses are often allocated in large blocks that mean many aren't generally available, and expert estimates forecast an end to new IPv4 addresses in 2011.

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