Pure Digital Flip Mino HD 720p with built-in video editing app

Pure Digital launched its its new $230 Flip Mino HD. The new Mino HD weighs 3.3 ounces; Pure Digital says it’s the “world’s smallest HD camcorder.” That means you can expect it to be smaller that its chief competitor, the Kodak Zi6. The Zi6 is cheaper, though ($180), and sports a 2.4-inch display — that’s larger […]

Pure Digital launched its its new $230 Flip Mino HD. The new Mino HD weighs 3.3 ounces; Pure Digital says it’s the “world’s smallest HD camcorder.” That means you can expect it to be smaller that its chief competitor, the Kodak Zi6. The Zi6 is cheaper, though ($180), and sports a 2.4-inch display — that’s larger than the Flip Mino HD’s 1.5-inch screen. The Kodak camera also comes with expandable memory in the form of an SD card slot (it supports cards up to 32GB), while the Mino HD is limited to its 4GB of internal storage.

The camera matches the 720p widescreen, fixed zoom capture of most of its opponents but opts for a built-in 4GB of flash memory rather than the SD cards of others. This gives it an hour of storage for HD out of the box in the Mino HD's native MPEG-4 format, which also makes most videos relatively portable both to web video and to video editing tools, including iMovie. Pure estimates about two hours of battery life with the extra demand from the improved footage.

If you like you gadgets customized, you’ll be happy to hear that the Mino HD is “designable.” That means you can forgo a bland, black design and get a Mino HD decked out in one of the patterns available at theflip.com. You also can create your own pattern.

A new built-in video editing app is deemed just as important as the larger resolution. Called FlipShare, the new tool is available just after plugging the camera into a USB port and gives both Mac and Windows PC users a basic suite both for altering clips (including backing music) as well as exporting the final prodcut, including uploads to sites like MySpace or YouTube. Options also exist to capture stills from the video as photos, e-mail videos, or to produce mail-order DVD movies instead of authoring the disc at home.

Source:→ Electronista