Get Mac OS X Leopard and Windows work together

One of the major selling points for Macs and Mac OS X Leopard these days is their ability to work well in a largely Windows world. Apple offers two ways to accomplish this task: “Leopard's ability to share files and printers with Windows machines, and the ability of Intel-based Macs to run Windows using either Boot […]

One of the major selling points for Macs and Mac OS X Leopard these days is their ability to work well in a largely Windows world. Apple offers two ways to accomplish this task: “Leopard's ability to share files and printers with Windows machines, and the ability of Intel-based Macs to run Windows using either Boot Camp (which is included free as part of Leopard) or third-party virtualization tools.”

Although Leopard and Windows typically play well together, understanding some of the nuances for getting a new Mac to talk with your existing PCs -- or getting the best experience running Windows on that new Mac -- can sometimes be a little challenging. In this article, we'll look at some of the details you should understand to get the best of both worlds.

When Leopard and Windows need to talk on a network: Our first set of tips relates to those situations where you have one or more Macs running Leopard that need to share files or other resources with Windows machines over a network connection. For the most part, these tips apply to home or small office environments.

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