Lippert CoreExpress-ECO computer-on-module (COM): Smallest x86 board

Lippert has upped the maximum amount of RAM available soldered onto its CoreExpress-ECO computer-on-module (COM). Now available with 2GB of RAM, and targeting mobile embedded PC applications, the 28-gram, Intel Atom-based board uses Lippert's own 2.3 x 2.6 inch (58 x 65mm) "CoreExpress" COM format.  Lippert claims the CoreExpress-ECO is "still the smallest advanced Computer-On-Module." […]

Lippert has upped the maximum amount of RAM available soldered onto its CoreExpress-ECO computer-on-module (COM). Now available with 2GB of RAM, and targeting mobile embedded PC applications, the 28-gram, Intel Atom-based board uses Lippert's own 2.3 x 2.6 inch (58 x 65mm) "CoreExpress" COM format.

 Lippert claims the CoreExpress-ECO is "still the smallest advanced Computer-On-Module." While no definition of "advanced" is offered, there is no argument that the board is quite small, indeed, compared to, say, an Atom-based PicoITX board, such as Axiomtek's PICO820. How much smaller?

At 3,770 square millimeters, the CoreExpress module covers roughly half the 7,200 square millimeter footprint of a PicoITX board (see illustration below). Of course, PicoITX boards typically come with real-world I/O and lots of pin headers, whereas the CoreExpress-ECO is a "COM" (computer-on-module) intended to attach to a custom I/O board via its 220-pin surface-mount connector. So, the comparison is not all that fair. Stacking a custom baseboard would significantly increase the thickness and/or the overall dimensions of the package.

More infoCoreExpress-ECO

Source:→ WindowsForDevices.com