Slipshod cryptographic housekeeping left OpenID open to abuse

Slipshod cryptographic housekeeping left some OpenID services far less secure than they ought to be. OpenID is a shared identity service that enables users to eliminate the need for punters to create separate IDs and logins for websites that support the service. A growing number of around 9,000 websites support the decentralised service, which offers […]

Slipshod cryptographic housekeeping left some OpenID services far less secure than they ought to be. OpenID is a shared identity service that enables users to eliminate the need for punters to create separate IDs and logins for websites that support the service. A growing number of around 9,000 websites support the decentralised service, which offers a a URL-based system for single sign-on.

Security researchers discovered the websites run by three OpenID providers - including Sun Microsystems - used SSL certificates with weak crypto keys. Instead of being generated from billions of possibilities, the keys came from a a set of just 32,768 options, due to a flaw in the random number generation routines used by Debian. The bug, which has been dormant on systems for 18 months, was discovered and corrected back in May.

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