OpenDNS earns $20k/day filtering "phishing and porn"

OpenDNS, a San Francisco based DNS service provider, launched in mid-2006, as a free tool to speed up web surfing and protect users from phishing and other malware sites. OpenDNS isn’t exactly a sexy service. Users have to do some basic configuration of their computer to get it going, and once it’s running they rarely see […]

OpenDNS, a San Francisco based DNS service provider, launched in mid-2006, as a free tool to speed up web surfing and protect users from phishing and other malware sites.

OpenDNS isn’t exactly a sexy service. Users have to do some basic configuration of their computer to get it going, and once it’s running they rarely see it again.

Here’s when you do see it - when you type in or click a link to a “bad” site, OpenDNS redirects you to their own page instead, which includes search results and contextual ads. The site has become a hit with schools and businesses that want to filter out any of 50 categories of websites (things like gambling, porn, social networking, etc.). Users can also whitelist or blacklist individual sites.

The service has 500,000 registered accounts, that resolves about 7 billion DNS queries per day and serves about 2 million search pages per day. Revenue from search pages brings in as much as $20,000 per day. They currently work exclusively with Yahoo, Ulevitch says.

Source:→ TechCrunch