Windows 7 may mirror .NET

If the listings that appeared in late June on the Microsoft Professional Developers Conference Web site are to be taken literally, Microsoft plans to discuss some new native communications and graphics features, which appear to mirror .NET functionality, for Windows 7. The conference, commonly known as PDC, is scheduled for Oct. 27 to 30 in […]

If the listings that appeared in late June on the Microsoft Professional Developers Conference Web site are to be taken literally, Microsoft plans to discuss some new native communications and graphics features, which appear to mirror .NET functionality, for Windows 7.

The conference, commonly known as PDC, is scheduled for Oct. 27 to 30 in Los Angeles. This year’s PDC is the first since 2005.

The PDC agenda lists sessions called Windows 7: Web Services in Native Code and Windows 7: Graphics Advances.

Presently, Windows users must install the .NET Framework 3.0 or above to utilize the Web Services Protocol Stack that is built into the Windows Communication Foundation, introduced last year with Windows Vista and also available through the .NET Framework 3.0 distribution for Windows XP.

Although the description of the “Graphics Advances” session does not divulge much in the way of details, a Microsoft job posting back in March that sought a lead software development engineer for the Windows UI Platform Team appeared to indicate that the company was going to design and implement a new UI framework for Windows.

The job posting noted in part that the framework would “eliminate much of the drudgery of Win32 UI development and enable rich, graphical, animated user interface [sic] by using markup based UI and a small, high performance, native code runtime.”

The technical disclosure that was detailed in the job posting reveals that Windows 7 may have features that are remarkably similar to .NET. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), the graphical subsystem in .NET Framework, and Microsoft Silverlight, a subset of WPF, make use of XAML, which is an XML-based mark up language used to define UI elements.

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