IDC: Microsoft cited "Nine reasons fueling software piracy"

Pirated software’s are hurting software industry, software partners and environment partners. Pirated software’s are now reach from home users to corporate users. A new whitepaper on the piracy phenomenon authored by market analysis company IDC and sponsored by Microsoft and the International  Association of Microsoft Certified Partners identifies no less than nine reasons which fuel software […]

Pirated software’s are hurting software industry, software partners and environment partners. Pirated software’s are now reach from home users to corporate users. A new whitepaper on the piracy phenomenon authored by market analysis company IDC and sponsored by Microsoft and the International  Association of Microsoft Certified Partners identifies no less than nine reasons
which fuel software piracy. [White Paper]

“In interviews with software ecosystem members for this whitepaper we learned that a customer's decision to use pirated or unlicensed software, if, in fact, the customer knew it was doing so could come about for a number of reasons,” IDC stated.

Here are the nine reasons as outlined by IDC for Microsoft:

1. As a deliberate attempt to save money;
2. The pirated software came bundled with the hardware;
3, Cash flow issues... the customer has the money, just not today;
4. Procurement policies that burden IT staff. Who then use demo products to solve immediate IT needs;
5. Company operations that grow faster than procurement increases legitimate licenses;
6. An initial solution that has pirated software bundled into it, and when the company goes to upgrade it can't afford the sudden cost to become legal;
7. A master license agreement that is negotiated elsewhere in the company than where the software is used - confusion between implementers and procurement;
8. Easily available demo or trial software that ends up deployed as production software; the vendor may never follow up;
9. Vendor licensing programs that are too complex; users just give up.