Working with Large Print Jobs in Windows

 There are sometimes situations where printing of very large documents containing high resolution graphics, text and images is needed.  With the growing technology of high end cameras flourishing in the market, image sizes are growing larger and larger.  Additionally, image editing applications present endless opportunities to enhance and modify images to your heart's content. Due […]

 There are sometimes situations where printing of very large documents containing high resolution graphics, text and images is needed.  With the growing technology of high end cameras flourishing in the market, image sizes are growing larger and larger.  Additionally, image editing applications present endless opportunities to enhance and modify images to your heart's content. Due to the amount of information stored in images like this, the final spool job can sometimes reach multiple gigabytes in size.  There are some issues seen when we print extremely large print jobs – our focus today will be on those issues, as well as some solutions.  Let’s get started with having a look at the issues first.

  1. When a print job reaches 3.99 GB in size, the counter for the job size resets to 0 and it starts growing again.
  2. While printing the job, the printer prints the initial data and then suddenly spits out the paper as if the print job is over.  On restarting the print job, it starts printing again from the beginning.

To keep the scope of our discussion within reason, the environment in our example is Windows XP/ Windows Vista/Windows Server 2003 x64 clients and Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2008 x64 as the print server.  To begin with, it is often thought that a print job cannot grow over 4 GB in size, but this is not true.  The spool file (.spl file) which gets created can actually grow easily to over 4 GB in size.  Thus, the obvious question, why do very large print jobs fail to print as expected?  There are two reasons for this behavior: