Five points to consider to make Windows 7 better

Part of the problem is that you really need to do a clean installation of Windows Vista to appreciate it. Those who've upgraded from XP have had nothing but problems. I frequently visit message boards at which users bash Vista for instability and incompatibility, but it usually turns out they did an in-place upgrade from […]

Part of the problem is that you really need to do a clean installation of Windows Vista to appreciate it. Those who've upgraded from XP have had nothing but problems. I frequently visit message boards at which users bash Vista for instability and incompatibility, but it usually turns out they did an in-place upgrade from XP. Don't ask me why that's such a bad idea, but it seems to cause more problems than any upgrade is worth.

Here’re five points for the Microsoft engineers to consider to make Windows 7, which is supposedly in the works, far better than Vista ever could have been—all from an enthusiast's point of view.

1. Trim the fat. Get rid of everything unnecessary to the average user to increase performance. If power users want to install extras or enable obscure services, let them, but stop assuming that every computer needs every possible service running by default. The same goes with anything running in the background. Be ruthless: If it doesn't need to be there all the time, make it go away.

2. Make the system requirements reasonable. I should not have to fit into a rig a multicore CPU and 2GB of memory to run an operating system. Get back to basics: The purpose of an OS is to allow a user to operate a computer and run programs on it. There are Linux distros that still run on original Pentium computers, and even weaker PCs. For heaven's sake, lower the requirements.

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