Microsoft Unified Modeling Language (UML) routed through Oslo

While initial reviews of Bill Gates’ final Microsoft keynote in his chief architect role were rather underwhelming, partner in crime Jack Vaughan caught one interesting detail that was latched onto by Michael Meehan this week: that Microsoft’s forthcoming Microsoft SOA strategy would indeed embrace Unified Modeling Language (UML) as its core modeling language.Previously, Microsoft had […]

While initial reviews of Bill Gates’ final Microsoft keynote in his chief architect role were rather underwhelming, partner in crime Jack Vaughan caught one interesting detail that was latched onto by Michael Meehan this week: that Microsoft’s forthcoming Microsoft SOA strategy would indeed embrace Unified Modeling Language (UML) as its core modeling language.

Previously, Microsoft had been noncommittal and was promoting the idea of Domain Specific Languages (DSLs) as a replacement for UML. The backdrop to all this is that, while UML received practically universal vendor support when it was proposed a decade ago, version 2.0 took UML down a much weightier, more controversial path.

At the recent TechEd, Microsoft committed to releasing a community technology preview of three Oslo pillars: development tools, repository, and a new declarative modeling language that ZDNet's Mary Jo Foley has reported is code named “D”. So, what to make of Gates’ commitment (probably his last Microsoft product decision) to UML?

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