Microsoft sets to simplifying Java/.NET Integration

Loraine Lawson: In March, I interviewed Alex Krapf, president of CodeMesh, about his company’s unique solution to the problem of porting applications from Java into the .NET world. Basically, it translates code from Java to C++ or C# - or vice versa, depending on your needs. “When Microsoft came out with .NET, we immediately said […]

Loraine Lawson: In March, I interviewed Alex Krapf, president of CodeMesh, about his company’s unique solution to the problem of porting applications from Java into the .NET world. Basically, it translates code from Java to C++ or C# - or vice versa, depending on your needs.

“When Microsoft came out with .NET, we immediately said alright, that’s a winning technology, let’s put Java into that because we know for sure that Microsoft is not going to put Java into that mix,” Krapf said.

Apparently, Microsoft reconsidered.

InformationWeek reports, that Microsoft has taken the Stocktrader application, written with Java Enterprise Edition, and moved it over to .NET, thus demonstrating its platform can be used for SOA. Technically, Microsoft isn’t translating the code – it didn’t even change the code – so it’s not exactly the same as the Codemesh solution. But it’s pretty big news.

Microsoft hooked the application’s Java server pages up to its Web services layer, which is managed by update of Microsoft Configuration Service. Version 2.0 of the configuration service will be released to select customers in beta soon. Microsoft wants to replace hand-coded integration between Java and .NET with “drop down menus and other easy to use features in Configuration Service to set up linkages and communications between their Windows applications and the software of a non-Windows partner,” according to the article.

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Microsoft, Sun, Java, .NET Framework, Data Integration, SOA, .NET