Logitech SqueezeBox Duet and SqueezeServer - Review

Slim Devices was founded in 2001 and alongside the original SqueezeBox developed SlimServer, the forerunner of SqueezeCentre, as an open source, community developed music server software which powers SqueezeBox, and Transporter as well as SqeezeNetwork delivering internet content to devices without a PC. Slim Devices became a Logitech company in 2006. At CES in 2008 […]

Slim Devices was founded in 2001 and alongside the original SqueezeBox developed SlimServer, the forerunner of SqueezeCentre, as an open source, community developed music server software which powers SqueezeBox, and Transporter as well as SqeezeNetwork delivering internet content to devices without a PC. Slim Devices became a Logitech company in 2006.

At CES in 2008 the SqueezeBox Duet was launched to widespread acclaim. I started chasing down a SqueezeBox Duet in early February 2008, but no one had any in stock and I joined several waiting lists. Eventually my patience paid off and I got my Squeezebox Duet from my local Sevenoaks audio store in Cambridge.

The Duet arrives in an attractively packaged box with the controller and receiver presented in matching black packaging and covered in protective plastic film and a robust metal base charger for the controller.

The receiver unit connects to your home wired/wireless network and your amplifier and is minimalistic in design with one button on the front and at the rear, connections for power, ethernet, optical out and digital out and two analogue stereo connections on the back. As well as the power adapter and lead, the kit includes a phono stereo audio cable.

The remote control has a colour LCD screen at the top, below which is a central button surrounded by a jog style wheel and four buttons at each corner. Button controls for volume, pause and next/previous track are on the lower part of the unit. There is a 3.5mm socket and window for the infrared emitter. The unit is supplied with a rechargeable lithium battery. Interestingly, the controller is a wireless network device in its own right, attaching either to your wireless network directly or through the SqueezeBox. Inside the controller is a slot for a compact flash card for an unamed future use - community suggestions include a portable MP3 player or portable streaming device, but no software yet.

A short guide to setting up the system is included with detailed documentation being accessed via the net.

After installing the supplied rechargeable battery and putting the controller on charge I moved on to installing SqueezeCentre on Windows Home Server. 

SqueezeCentre version 7.0 is a music server that will run on Windows Home Server and other operating systems to deliver your stored music  to the SqueezeBox receiver and HiFi via your network. The latest version of SqueezeCentre is downloaded from SqueezeNetwork and installed on the home server.

LED colour

Meaning

RED (solid)

Booting up

RED (blinking slow)

Waiting to be setup

YELLOW

Waiting for wireless to connect / Link down on Ethernet

GREEN

Network connected, waiting for DHCP to get IP address (skipped when using static IP)

BLUE

Waiting to connect to SqueezeCenter or SqueezeNetwork

WHITE

Connected to SqueezeCenter or SqueezeNetwork

WHITE (blinking fast)

Firmware update in progress

RED (blinking fast)

Factory Reset and Xilinx update in progress

PURPLE

Hard error with blink codes, a number of blinks with a one second pause in between

Full Review

Logitech, SqueezeBox, SqueezeServer, Review, Audio, DLNA, Digital Device, HiFi, Music, Streaming, WHS, Windows Home Server, Digital Media Receiver