Google Search Quality interviews by Matt Cutts & Popular Mechanics

Two new Google Search Quality interviews are available on net, one is from Popular Mechanics and another one from Googler, Matt Cutts. Popular Mechanics interviewed Google’s Search Quality VP, Udi Manber and asked 20 (Rare) Questions for Google Search. Udi talks about search, personalization and the influence of social networks on finding the information you need. […]

Two new Google Search Quality interviews are available on net, one is from Popular Mechanics and another one from Googler, Matt Cutts. Popular Mechanics interviewed Google’s Search Quality VP, Udi Manber and asked 20 (Rare) Questions for Google Search. Udi talks about search, personalization and the influence of social networks on finding the information you need.

Here’s an excerpt from the transcript:

How have you seen search evolve in the time that you’ve been working in the field?
It’s been tremendous. I like to say that it’s almost science fiction every five years. When the first search engine appeared in ‘94, compared with when I came out of academia in ‘99, compared with the way it was in 2003, compared with the way it is today—every five years there have been just incredible advances. What we do now, we couldn’t have foreseen 10 years ago. Today we’re finding a lot more information, and the questions are getting a lot harder. People expect more from us.

What do you think a person expects from a Web search?
They want to get an answer. Our goal is very simple: We want to return to the user the answer that they need.

While we’re talking on the subject of personalization, a colleague of mine said that search as you know it is falling to the wayside and changing dramatically as social networking comes into play—trending toward this MySpace-Facebook model where people look to their friends or their community as the take-off point. Do you see that as a bona fide trend? And, if so, does search become less important?
Search has always been about people. It’s not an abstract thing. It’s not a formula. It’s about getting people what they need. The art of ranking is one of taking lots of signals and putting them together. Signals from your friends are better signals, stronger signals. On the other hand, many searches are long-tail kinds of searches. If you’re looking for what movies to see tonight, your friend can probably give you the best information. If you’re looking for the address of the business, the Web as a whole can give you better information. If you’re looking for something obscure about anything, again the web can give you much better information. It depends on the type of search you do—and how to take all those signals and put them together. [Full Transcript]

Matt Cutts is the head of Webspam for Google did an audio/podcast interview with Duct Tape Marketing.

[…]in this episode he shares his tips for ranking well on Google.

We spend a fair amount of time validating the fact that well thought out blogs will help you rank higher in the search indexes. That's enough ROI to do it.

He also confirmed that the meta description tag and alt attributes are currently used by Google. In fact, we cover most of the on page code tags and attributes.

Marketing podcast with Matt Cutts

Google, Search, Search Quality, SEO, Search Engine, Matt Cutts, Podcast, Interview