Windows XP, Windows Vista and the long run for Microsoft

Let's go ahead and call it a movement, or at least a cause. What started as an online petition demanding that Microsoft offer XP indefinitely and not scrap it with OEMs for Vista in June has become something greater, something that has leaked out of the trade press and nerd circles and into the real […]

Let's go ahead and call it a movement, or at least a cause. What started as an online petition demanding that Microsoft offer XP indefinitely and not scrap it with OEMs for Vista in June has become something greater, something that has leaked out of the trade press and nerd circles and into the real world.

It's not just about an online petition -- a concept we've always found a bit silly, but that's an aside -- anymore. It's about users talking to Microsoft and Microsoft looking away and whistling as if nobody's saying anything at all. And it's about Redmond hitting a wall with how much it can push people around with forced upgrades. (Speaking of XP, by the way, Service Pack 3 is apparently finally on the way.)

Most partners don't seem too concerned about the fate of Vista itself -- at least not yet, anyway. There's not all that much money to be made in OS sales or even hardware refreshes these days; most of the dough is in consulting and services. VARs, consultants and integrators can build on pretty much any Microsoft platform and might even prefer working with XP as an OS.

There are greater issues in play for Microsoft, though. We at RCPU have long maintained that Vista would eventually become most people's default operating system, that we'd come in time to embrace it the way we now seem to love XP. But, with Microsoft already dropping hints about Windows 7 arriving as early as 2009, we're not quite so sure anymore.

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Microsoft, Windows XP, Windows Vista