Windows Server 2003 reliability crashes in 2007

The downtime experienced by Windows Server 2003 increased 25 percent to nine hours per server per year, while the reliability of mainstream server-based Linux distributions improved significantly, according to a Yankee Group survey. The research firm's survey also noted a significant rise in enterprise interest in Ubuntu, previously known primarily as a desktop operating system. […]

The downtime experienced by Windows Server 2003 increased 25 percent to nine hours per server per year, while the reliability of mainstream server-based Linux distributions improved significantly, according to a Yankee Group survey.

The research firm's survey also noted a significant rise in enterprise interest in Ubuntu, previously known primarily as a desktop operating system.

The 2007-2008 Global Server Operating System Reliability Survey presents a substantially different picture compared to the results of the last such survey in 2006, in which Windows administrators reported less downtime than their counterparts who used Linux -- a result that stirred up controversy at the time.

Over 2007 and 2008, Linux distributions from Red Hat and Novell increased reliability by an average of 75 percent, respondents to the survey said.

Downtime on Windows Server 2003, meanwhile, increased by 25 percent, to nearly nine hours per server, per year, the survey found.

"Windows Server 2003's decreased reliability is attributable to a series of security alerts that Microsoft issued in the [northern] summer and autumn timeframe which caused network administrators to take their Windows Server 2003 machines offline for significantly longer periods of time to apply remedial patches," said Yankee Group analyst Laura DiDio in a research note.

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Windows Server 2003, Reliability, Stability, Ubuntu, Linux, Red Hat, Novell, Operating System