Exchange 2007 SP1 mobile policies, ECAL and MDM

Organizations might choose to go with Exchange to manage their mobile devices and other organizations might use System Center Mobile Device Manager (MDM for short).  This particular posting is more about product direction, product offerings and the device management roadmap. If this stuff bores the hell out of you, or if you are more interested […]

Organizations might choose to go with Exchange to manage their mobile devices and other organizations might use System Center Mobile Device Manager (MDM for short).  This particular posting is more about product direction, product offerings and the device management roadmap. If this stuff bores the hell out of you, or if you are more interested in cool scripting tips to manage your Exchange Server, you're reading the right blog; but this post is more high-level and strategy focused, you can reclaim the 5 mins it would take to read the rest of this and just read the next posting when it comes out, I promise that one will be more tech. focused.  For now I want to address some of the questions I've heard people asking.

Introduction: A couple of folks have been asking about MDM and how it fits into the idea of mobile messaging and control when most of us are used to managing such devices from within the Exchange Management Console.  Up until now devices have been managed in Exchange Server and thus some people are wondering how Exchange's mobile device management, and MDM's work together.

Ultimately our goal with these separate offerings is about choice.  Many other offerings in the device management market give people one option for device control and charge them for that.  We saw a better way to give people an option to pay for what they wanted, and allow them to migrate their way into the fast growing world of mobile devices at a pace, and cost, that's right for them.  That said; here's how we are thinking about mobile device management and the future and it starts by thinking of e-mail administrators, dealing with mobile devices, as having one of three mobile device needs: Adoption, Control or Management.

Adoption: The adoption stage is where administrators are usually running small operations or have very little mobility concerns.  These users are mostly interested in enabling the full mobile messaging experience at a very low cost and allowing access with a broad range of devices.  Exchange ActiveSync fits the need perfectly since it is included in the Exchange Standard Client Access License price (this means if you already pay for a CAL to access a mailbox via Outlook or OWA than this is included in that).  Included in this set of mobility features are things that fall into the categories of Synchronization, Authentication and Encryption.  Users get access to Direct Push e-mail, can sync all their data, remote wipe, get basic PIN policies, data encryption and the ability to access this data from any Exchange ActiveSync enabled device (See some of our Exchange ActiveSync licensees here) at no additional cost.  This is a great way for organizations to get mobility up and going quick and easy.

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Exchange Server 2007, Exchange 2007, Mobile, ECAL, MDM, Mobility, Knowledgebase