Microsoft relaxed Windows Vista virtualization rules

Microsoft dropped its prohibition on running the most popular versions of Windows Vista in virtual machines because of a complaint filed with antitrust regulators, court documents show.According to a status report filed with U.S. District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly , Microsoft changed the EULA (end-user licensing agreements) of Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium […]

Microsoft dropped its prohibition on running the most popular versions of Windows Vista in virtual machines because of a complaint filed with antitrust regulators, court documents show.

According to a status report filed with U.S. District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly , Microsoft changed the EULA (end-user licensing agreements) of Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium under pressure from Phoenix Technologies. Phoenix, best known for the BIOS, or firmware, that it sells to PC makers, had filed a complaint with regulators sometime after early November 2007, arguing that Microsoft should open the less-expensive versions of Vista to virtualization.

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Microsoft, Windows Vista, Vista Home, Vista Premium, Virtualization, Virtual Machine, EULA, Licensing, Lawsuit