Windows Server 2008: You need new hardware to keep things stable

The big message from Microsoft's gala launch on Wednesday had to do with changing the world, and the role information workers may play to that end. Yet Microsoft's own business customers are looking for operating systems to stop making sweeping changes to the way they work, to stop forcing them to make plans around Microsoft's […]

The big message from Microsoft's gala launch on Wednesday had to do with changing the world, and the role information workers may play to that end. Yet Microsoft's own business customers are looking for operating systems to stop making sweeping changes to the way they work, to stop forcing them to make plans around Microsoft's itinerary...and the company's own program mangers are acknowledging this new reality.

"Both our customers and our partners don't want major changes in the operating system every two years," said Bob Visse, senior director of the Windows Server Marketing Group, in an interview with BetaNews on Wednesday, the day of Windows Server 2008's official release. "So we've committed to being on a regular cadence of doing a major release every four years, plus or minus a few months, and a minor release every two years."

It's a variation of the "tick-tock" cadence model that Intel instituted in the summer of 2006, both as a trademark for its rapid pace of progress and an annoyance for AMD: Start doing major changes on a schedule that everyone can anticipate, and don't spring surprises on customers who aren't prepared.

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Microsoft, Windows Server 2008, Ws2008, Win2K8, Windows Server, Hardware