Microsoft: Server Virtualisation is overhyped and less used

Server virtualisation is over-hyped and less used than reported, according to Microsoft executives speaking at the launch of Windows Server 2008. Microsoft corporate VP Bob Kelly claimed that despite the technology being the "buzz of the industry", less than 10 percent of servers sold into the market are being deployed as hosts for virtualised servers. […]

Server virtualisation is over-hyped and less used than reported, according to Microsoft executives speaking at the launch of Windows Server 2008.

Microsoft corporate VP Bob Kelly claimed that despite the technology being the "buzz of the industry", less than 10 percent of servers sold into the market are being deployed as hosts for virtualised servers.

"Virtualisation is important technology, but not an end unto itself," Kelly said. "The hype around virtualisation is so strong, literally the next thing that happens after you deploy it is VM [Virtual Machine] sprawl. You talk to any customer that's deployed it and they'll tell you they have VMs popping up everywhere. All they've done is taken a utilisation problem and made it a management problem."

Server virtualisation has been a sore spot for Microsoft. For a start, its introduction removed the need for some customers to buy Microsoft licences and now that the technology has become popular among users, Microsoft is faced with the difficult task of playing catch-up with market leader, VMware.

Microsoft's latest attempt to tackle this market is Hyper-V. Limited to a beta release within the RTM of Windows Server 2008, the final version of Hyper-V is expected to ship in 180 days.

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Microsoft, Virtualization, Server Virtualization, Virtual Server, Windows Server 2008, WS2008, Win2K8, Windows Server, Virtual Machine, VM, VMware, Hyper-V, RTM