Microsoft forces pirate to advertise anti-piracy

Microsoft is a perpetual participant in a race against software piracy in which the company has seen many small victories, but with no end in sight. While it has always been the policy over in Redmond to treat end users running counterfeit software products as victims of the piracy phenomenon, as much as Microsoft itself, […]

Microsoft is a perpetual participant in a race against software piracy in which the company has seen many small victories, but with no end in sight. While it has always been the policy over in Redmond to treat end users running counterfeit software products as victims of the piracy phenomenon, as much as Microsoft itself, the company has not hesitated in the least to gun for those involved in the process of producing or distributing bootlegged materials for their own benefit. Working  with law enforcement agencies across the world, Microsoft is constantly applauding small steps forward in bringing software pirates down. And one practice that has become somewhat of a tradition is to force pirates to advertise anti-piracy after they have been apprehended. It's the case of a seller of fake Certificates of Authenticity from Singapore.

"In the past year, I have been selling recycled Certificates of Authenticity on the Internet in auction sites. On 13 December 2006, the law caught up with me and I was raided by the Police at home where copies of counterfeit CD-ROMs were seized. Apart from selling recycled Certificates of Authenticity, my actions in advertising illegal products in the World Wide Web may also tarnish Singapore’s image as an Intellectual Property hub. Further, I have caused unnecessary distress to my family by my irresponsible actions. Intellectual property rights must be respected and I urge everyone to learn from my mistake. Software piracy takes from Singapore’s IT industry thousands of local jobs, millions in local wages, tax revenues, as well as investments in new technologies," reads the advertisement message from the Microsoft pirate.

Examples like the man from Serangoon apologizing publicly for selling recycled Microsoft COAs on Internet auction sites is a part of the company's strategy to educate the end users not to use, sell or buy pirated software. In this context, the Redmond company now offers support for an IP rights curriculum aimed to educate students on intellectual property rights.

Source:→ softpedia

Microsoft, Piracy, Antipiracy, Anti-piracy, Software Piracy, Pirated Software