Windows 7 Effect

First, there was the wait for Windows Vista. Then there was the wait for Windows Vista SP1. Now many pundits are claiming that enterprise users will hold off migrating to Windows Vista and wait for the release of Windows 7.How can Microsoft counter this? By leaking information about Windows 7 of course!Microsoft’s been having a […]

First, there was the wait for Windows Vista. Then there was the wait for Windows Vista SP1. Now many pundits are claiming that enterprise users will hold off migrating to Windows Vista and wait for the release of Windows 7.

How can Microsoft counter this? By leaking information about Windows 7 of course!

Microsoft’s been having a tough time of late convincing people (important people, such as system admins and those with their hand on the check book) that Windows Vista is the future. Part of the problem is that Windows Vista has been dogged by high profile “issues” relating to compatibility, speed and reliability – things that people consider important in an operating system.

To counter these issues Microsoft developed and released SP1 (by the time you read this MSDN and TechNet users will be able to get their hands on this service pack, but others – the mere mortals reading this – will have to wait until mid-March for the download or mid-April for SP1 to come via Windows Update). SP1 is not only a massive pack of bug fixes but also brings the Vista kernel into line with that of Windows Server 2008.

Another problem for Vista is competition from another operating system. No, not Mac or a Linux distro, but its older brother – Windows XP. The fact that Windows XP is just so darn good is a big problem for Vista.

Sure, SP1 for Vista improves a few key features, but even then the appeal of XP is hard to resist – after all, it’s the devil you know. Oh, and remember that XP SP3 is imminent, and that should make XP even better.

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Microsoft, Windows Vista, Vists SP1, Windows 7, Windows Seven, Win7, WinMin, windows XP, Windows Server 2008, WS2008