Why has Sony Ericsson succumbed to Microsoft Windows?

Why has Sony Ericsson 'succumbed' to Microsoft? The way the company's CTO Mats Lindoff explained it to us, is that you can't crack the US market without it. He was giving El Reg a glimpse into the future. "We need products in all categories, maybe not in the ultra-low segment, but a broad portfolio. Windows […]

Why has Sony Ericsson 'succumbed' to Microsoft? The way the company's CTO Mats Lindoff explained it to us, is that you can't crack the US market without it. He was giving El Reg a glimpse into the future.

"We need products in all categories, maybe not in the ultra-low segment, but a broad portfolio. Windows Mobile in the US and in Nordic countries is the IT manager's choice."

Lindoff doesn't expect the Windows-powered Xperia to be a volume seller. Sony Ericsson is going for the "techie" niche which wants high performance and is willing to meet a high price to get it.

"It's not that UIQ can't deliver," Lindoff said. SE has put UIQ, a graphical user interface built on the Symbian OS, into two excellent new handsets, in the mid-range for the first time. The only serious disappointment with the G700 and G900 is that we won't be able to get hold of them until the end of the summer. They're as slim as the mid-range favourites like the K800i that they replace, but much more powerful – with touchscreens and (in the case of the G900) Wi-Fi.

Sony Ericsson stopped making CDMA handsets three years ago, but Lindoff doesn't think this will handicap its latest parry into North America, where 50 per cent of the market now uses CDMA. The Xperia X1 is GSM/W-CDMA. SE's parent company Ericsson is showing LTE at 25Mbits/s, Lindoff pointed out - and is happy to wait.

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Microsoft, Sony, Ericsson, Windows Mobile, Windows Mobile Phone, Xperia, Xperia X1