Windows Server 2008: Upgrade Paths, Resource Limits & Registry Values

Only twenty-six more days until Windows Server 2008 is released to the world.  With that in mind, we have twenty-six posts lined up between now and February 27 covering areas of Windows Server 2008 that contain both general information as well as specific posts that are relevant to what we support here on the Performance […]

Only twenty-six more days until Windows Server 2008 is released to the world.  With that in mind, we have twenty-six posts lined up between now and February 27 covering areas of Windows Server 2008 that contain both general information as well as specific posts that are relevant to what we support here on the Performance team.  So without further ado, let's dive right in, beginning with the upgrade paths available for Windows Server 2008 shown in the table below:

If you are currently running:You can upgrade to:
Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition (R2, Service Pack 1 or Service Pack 2)Full Installation of Windows Server 2008 Standard Edition
Full Installation of Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition
Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition (R2, Service Pack 1 or Service Pack 2)Full Installation of Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition
Windows Server 2003 Datacenter Edition (R2, Service Pack 1 or Service Pack 2)Full Installation of Windows Server 2008 Datacenter Edition

There are a couple of important things to remember here.  First, with the exception of Windows Server 2008 for Itanium, the table above applies to both x86 and x64 versions.  However, cross-platform upgrades (x86 to x64 or vice-versa) are not supported.  It is also not possible to upgrade from a previous version of Windows to Windows Server 2008 Server Core Edition.

With respect to resource limits, there are also some changes to be aware of.  Many values that are dynamically configured for 32-bit versions of Windows Server 2008 are set to their maximum values in 64-bit versions since the virtual address range is much larger.  The notable exception to this rule is the NonPaged pool which is dependent on the amount of physical RAM installed.  The table below outlines the resource limits:

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Microsoft, WS2008, Windows Server 2008, Resource, Registry, Memory, Management, Memory Management, Architecture, Performance, Troubleshooting, Knowledgebase