Use a Single Data Store When Dual Booting Windows Vista and Linux

Dual booting Windows and Linux doesn't mean you have to maintain two separate sets of applications, preferences, and documents. With cross-platform, open-source applications like Firefox, Thunderbird and Pidgin, you can use the same apps with the same configuration automatically no matter what OS you've booted. Always access the most recent state of your Firefox browsing […]

Dual booting Windows and Linux doesn't mean you have to maintain two separate sets of applications, preferences, and documents. With cross-platform, open-source applications like Firefox, Thunderbird and Pidgin, you can use the same apps with the same configuration automatically no matter what OS you've booted. Always access the most recent state of your Firefox browsing history, IM buddy list, Thunderbird address book, and more from Windows or Linux using a single-point-of-contact data partition. Let's tear down at least part of the wall between Windows and Linux and start sharing files between the two dual-boot desktops.

This guide assumes you've got a relatively modern Linux distribution and either Windows XP or Vista set up on the same computer. If you're looking for help on setting up your system, try Adam's guide to triple-booting XP, Vista, and Ubuntu as a reference (leaving out one Windows system if necessary), or check out a dual-booting video guide at Linux.com. I'm using Windows Vista (Home Premium) and Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) in my own walk-through, but your mileage should only vary slighly with XP and other Linux distributions.

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