Malicious Flash file could take over your Router

Security researchers have released code showing how a pair of widely used technologies could be misused to take control of a victim's Web browsing experience. The code, published over the weekend by researchers Adrian Pastor and Petko Petkov, exploits features in two technologies: The Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) protocol, which is used by many […]

Security researchers have released code showing how a pair of widely used technologies could be misused to take control of a victim's Web browsing experience. The code, published over the weekend by researchers Adrian Pastor and Petko Petkov, exploits features in two technologies: The Universal Plug and Play (UPnP) protocol, which is used by many operating systems to make it easier for them to work with devices on a network; and Adobe Systems' Flash multimedia software.

By tricking a victim into viewing a malicious Flash file, an attacker could use UPnP to change the primary DNS (Domain Name System) server used by the router to find other computers on the Internet. This would give the attacker a virtually undetectable way to redirect the victim to fake Web sites. For example, a victim with a compromised router could be taken to the attacker's Web server, even if he typed Citibank.com directly into the Web browser navigation bar.

"The most malicious of all malicious things is to change the primary DNS server," the researchers wrote. "That will effectively turn the router and the network it controls into a zombie which the attacker can take advantage of whenever they feel like it."

PC World

Malware, Hacking, Malicious, Code, Flash, Router, Internet