iPhone secrecy, development flips wireless industry

The iPhone is one of the most widely craved devices to grace the consumer market; after millions of dollars invested in its development, and secrecy so intricate that even Apple’s own engineers were kept in the dark about the complete product. After releasing the iPod in 2002, Wired writes that CEO Steve Jobs began to […]

The iPhone is one of the most widely craved devices to grace the consumer market; after millions of dollars invested in its development, and secrecy so intricate that even Apple’s own engineers were kept in the dark about the complete product. After releasing the iPod in 2002, Wired writes that CEO Steve Jobs began to notice the variety of devices that people would carry with them in day-to-day activities – such as a cell phone, BlackBerry, and MP3 player. Jobs realized that the products would inevitably come together and could potentially dethrone the iPod, so he decided that Apple would have to out-innovate the competition with its own device.

When work on the iPhone officially started, secrecy was Jobs’ top priority. He recruited engineers to work on Purple 2 – a moniker based off a failed initial iPod phone, whose project was dubbed Purple 1 – and split them across the Apple’s Cupertino campus. Software and hardware development teams weren’t even able to interface with each other directly; hardware engineers designed the product around dummy software, while software developers designed the operating system to run on a circuit board housed by a wooden box.

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Apple, iPhone, Development, Wireless, Blackberry